TFS11 (vNext): Pending Changes

This is the next part in my series of TFS vNext posts:
Part 1: The My Work Tab

The Pending Changes tab has been revamped in Visual Studio. 

Before it was a list of files with tabs on the side for related work items, notes, policy warnings, and conflicts.
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Now it’s much more interactive:
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The idea is that you can easily relate your pending changes to one or more work items, exclude/include changes in your changeset, see conflicts, and work with shelvestes.  Looking at this screenshot above, I can right-click on “Error.cshtml” file and move it to the excluded group:
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Pending Changes also works closely with “My Work”, as you can see here, it shows that I have one “edit item” in progress, along with a bug that I’m working on.
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Here, I can select “Suspend”, where it lets me enter a note before shelving my changes:
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There are a couple of really cool things about this:

1) When I click on Resume, not only does it unshelve my changes, but it also puts my IDE back to the same state that it was when I suspended my work.  So all the windows and files that I had opened, are reopened for me. So it’s a true pause/restart.

2) In the current version of TFS, you cannot unshelve on top of checked-out files.  They solved this problem by adding the “Merge with In Progress”.  So now I can shelve something, start working on something else, and before I check that in, I can unshelve/merge with my current work.  I know I could’ve used that functionality many times.

Once you are ready to check-in, all the associations should be done, so you’ll get this message the first time (I always turn that prompt off):
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As expected, there is a link to my changeset in my Work Item:
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Next, I will cover the new Code Review functionality.

About esteban

Esteban is the Founder and Chief Technologist at Nebbia Technology, an ALM consulting and Azure-powered technology company. He is a software developer with a passion for ALM, TFS, Azure, and software development best practices. Esteban is a Microsoft Visual Studio ALM MVP and ALM Ranger, Pluralsight author, and the president of ONETUG (Orlando .NET User Group).


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